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February 27, 2017

Ep 12 – Anthony Liberatore

The Cinematography Podcast Episode 12 – Anthony Liberatore

The Cinematography Podcast returns with featured guest Anthony Liberatore.

If you’ve seen the Academy Award Best Picture Winner “Argo” then you’ve seen the work of Storyboard Artist Anthony Liberatore.  Chances are you’ve seen the results of his work in such massive studio tentpole franchise films like Mission Impossible, Captain America and Fast & Furious.

Follow Tony Liberatore

The War Story is from Roman Vas’yanov

Illya’s Short End this week is “8K.”

Ben’s Short End is the Showtime original series “Shooting Virtual Reality

Correction:  Illya mentions that noted cinematographer Sven Nykvist is related to “Nyquist Theory” but then gets distracted and unfortunately never explains that Sven Nykvist could use Nyquist Theory to describe the process of retaining the look of film after going through a telecine process.  The reality is that Sven Nykvist and the Nyquist-Shannon Sampling Therom are of course unrelated, but you can learn more about Nyquist-Shannon here.

Podcast Credits:

Editor in Chief:  Illya Friedman
Editor: Ben Rock
Composer: Kays Alatractchi

Listen to the Podcast

5 comments

  1. Patrick says:

    Hi,

    I graduated with a Film/Video degree from Penn State and have been living in Philadelphia for the past 3 years. I have a few mentors here in Philadelphia where I definitely learned a lot about improving my lighting techniques, composition, and the technology. I even read up on behing the scene posts for movies an dleanr a lot listening to this podcast, but I have gone no where in terms of career goals in cinematography. Listening to the podcast a lot of the cinematographers seem to have “made it” in LA or NYC, are those my only options to shoot movies and get paid for it by being in certain cities, or am I missing something?

  2. Illya Friedman says:

    Hi Patrick,

    Those are definitely not your only options. However, they are the two cities with the most opportunity. I know people who have become quite successful working in such smaller market cities as San Francisco, San Jose, Miami and Atlanta. Although to be fair, Atlanta is growing really fast and is already in the number 3 position. You really have to ask yourself what kind of content it is you want to shoot? If it’s weddings, you can do that anywhere. If it’s news, regional commercials or corporate work- there’s at least 25 metropolitan areas in the country you could live and work, including the Philadelphia/Tri-state area. LA and NYC are hotbeds for opportunities, but at the same time there are so many people “just starting out” in these cities, that the competition can feel a bit daunting. A widely repeated fact (not sure if it’s entirely true but sounds reasonable) is the average day rate in L.A. for a paid cinematographer “gig” on craigslist is $50. On a 12-hour day (as they typically are) that’s less than half of minimum wage. You have to know that this is what you want to do, and be prepared to not make a lot of money for your early “paid jobs.”

  3. Patrick says:

    Hi Illya,

    Thank you for the response! I am open to do commercial/corporate work as those are the jobs that pay the bills. But I would really like to be involved in narrative and documentary filmmaking (a dream of mine is to be a part of a planet earth production) which leads me to the conclusion that I should try a bit of writing and try the festival circuit as well.

  4. Hi Patrick,

    Since you are a fan of “Planet Earth” you might also want to consider joining the IDA. They are the largest association of documentary filmmakers that I’m aware of. They also sometimes have events and resources that may be of interest/help to you. Their website is http://www.documentary.org/

  5. Gustavo Pinheiro says:

    Nice podcast. What is the name of the facebook group that you mention in the end of the interview?

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